Naw-rūz

Ask me anything   Submit   Afghan/Born and raised in KPK. Moved to UK at the age of 11 and have since been living with the constant desire to run back to the mountains. Just a space to share some musings.
Interests: Politics/History/Culture/Religion

annethecatdetective:

burning-high-rise:

whorishgreen:

whorishgreen:

I’ve never been more emotional about any social media post in my entire life

UPDATE: guys Beth Broderick tweeted yesterday that this Salem is THE SAME SALEM!!! He’s 20 years old man!!!! 20!

That Salem is still kicking is all I care about.

(via radical-leftism)

— 1 hour ago with 134069 notes
Post-crisis Resilience of Communities in Swat- Malakand Region

I still recollect the difficult times when, for the first time I decided to contest the elections for the local government as an independent candidate in 2001.  In the under developed district of Lower Dir, women were barred by local influential figures through mutual agreements to cast their votes in elections, let alone to allow a woman as an independent candidate. Despite all opposition the people voted for me to become the first elected women councilor on non-reserved seat as an independent candidate.
The year 2008 was a period of great disappointment as militants had taken control of Swat valley excluding women from public spheres including putting ban on girl’s education for sometime. It appeared that all efforts by different actors, including my organization, have gone back to zero.
The operation Rah-e-Nijat in 2009 by Pakistan’s security forces dislodged militants from power, yet the challenge of rehabilitating almost two millions IDPs back in Swat appeared almost impossible. As if the testing of the people of Swat-Malakand region was not complete yet, devastating flood in 2010 washed swaths of agricultural land, affecting the livelihoods of millions of people.
It is indeed heartening to see the resilience of the people of Malakand region in bouncing back to their lives and getting back to whatever they had lost during the militancy and floods crisis. Personally, I am glade to see women now engaged in the discussions and activities that affect their lives politically, socially and economically at the community level. We wanted to promote the work of women embellished workers to increase their income through making them shareholders in the net profits of their labor. To this end we opened an outlet in the capital city of Islamabad and to showcase their work at national level in Pakistan. Apart from our own trained hundreds of women workers, MEDA[2] had trained and organized thousands of women embellished workers in Swat-Malakand region during the past five years. We have taken up the responsibility to become sustainability partner of MEDA for Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, which will enable us to link the work of MEDA for women economic empowerment to our own efforts of Shinkhalai. 
Shinkhalai is the brand name of our women economic empowerment program that is marketing and promoting women workers hand and machine made products. Unfortunately the precious work of the women embellishers is under valued because of the lack of competitiveness of their products with the market trends. We have engaged Hunerkada – the art and fashion designing school in Islamabad to overcome this gap and to design the products according to the prevailing market trends and demands at the national level.
To build synergies, we have linked the efforts of other institutions such as the women skill development program of Small Industrial Development Board (SIDB) of government of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Through a memorandum of understanding, we have agreed to pool resources and energies towards the economic empowerment of women in the disasters hit Swat-Malakand region for creating a greater impact.
During my interactions with women from Swat-Malakand region in our political empowerment program known as Jamhori Maidan program (JMP), I have felt extreme joy to see women taking an interest in democracy, political process and elections. It has enabled me to overcome the disappointments and depressions that I had experienced during my work with women IDPs from the region in 2010. The most amazing development in the JMP is the reality that women are not only taking interest in political developments but also there is an emerging trend amongst the educated female from the region that they can take independent decision to support a political party of their choice as against the preferences of their male members in their families. I have also seen many more women taking the courage to contest elections as independent candidates such as Ms. Nusrat Begum from Lower Dir, where she run for National assembly seat. Even women with disabilities are politically active and aware of their role in the society.
 The JMP  has engaged men and women from Malakand region to get engaged in bridging the gap between state-institutions and citizens through formation of citizen’s forums. Young women and men of the area have been trained to become leaders in the political sphere. Through radio talk shows, women and men have taken part in the discussions that relate to women participation in the political processes and their rights as equal citizens of Pakistan. In my opinion this is a huge development in changing the discourse and propaganda of the militants that they made through the use of FM radio channels in Swat-Malakand region.
To make these changes sustainable and provide them institutional backing, we have reached a memorandum of understanding with the Provincial Commission on the Status of Women (PCSW) to support the establishment of the District Committees on the Status of Women (DCSW) in three districts of Malakand division that include Lower Dir, Upper Dir and Malakand. The women leaders that have been trained in the JMP in the three districts are the potential nominees for the DCSWs.  It is rather saddening to see the pro-women PTI government being slow in notifying the DCSW in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. The DCSW have an important function with regard to cases of gender-based violence (GBV) and gender sensitive planning, budgeting and monitoring at the district level.
There are many women now ready to contest the forthcoming local government elections, as independent candidates after our political training program but unfortunately the local government elections in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa have not been held so far. These eager and motivated women leaders from the region are looking forward to the local government institutions as a great opportunity of their political empowerment and testing their leadership skills.

Let us hope that this journey of peace and progress continue in the region for our bright future.
Shad Begum is a human rights activist from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, and a recipient of international women of courage awards.

Post-crisis Resilience of Communities in Swat- Malakand Region

I still recollect the difficult times when, for the first time I decided to contest the elections for the local government as an independent candidate in 2001.  In the under developed district of Lower Dir, women were barred by local influential figures through mutual agreements to cast their votes in elections, let alone to allow a woman as an independent candidate. Despite all opposition the people voted for me to become the first elected women councilor on non-reserved seat as an independent candidate.

The year 2008 was a period of great disappointment as militants had taken control of Swat valley excluding women from public spheres including putting ban on girl’s education for sometime. It appeared that all efforts by different actors, including my organization, have gone back to zero.

The operation Rah-e-Nijat in 2009 by Pakistan’s security forces dislodged militants from power, yet the challenge of rehabilitating almost two millions IDPs back in Swat appeared almost impossible. As if the testing of the people of Swat-Malakand region was not complete yet, devastating flood in 2010 washed swaths of agricultural land, affecting the livelihoods of millions of people.

It is indeed heartening to see the resilience of the people of Malakand region in bouncing back to their lives and getting back to whatever they had lost during the militancy and floods crisis. Personally, I am glade to see women now engaged in the discussions and activities that affect their lives politically, socially and economically at the community level. We wanted to promote the work of women embellished workers to increase their income through making them shareholders in the net profits of their labor. To this end we opened an outlet in the capital city of Islamabad and to showcase their work at national level in Pakistan. Apart from our own trained hundreds of women workers, MEDA[2] had trained and organized thousands of women embellished workers in Swat-Malakand region during the past five years. We have taken up the responsibility to become sustainability partner of MEDA for Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, which will enable us to link the work of MEDA for women economic empowerment to our own efforts of Shinkhalai. 

Shinkhalai is the brand name of our women economic empowerment program that is marketing and promoting women workers hand and machine made products. Unfortunately the precious work of the women embellishers is under valued because of the lack of competitiveness of their products with the market trends. We have engaged Hunerkada – the art and fashion designing school in Islamabad to overcome this gap and to design the products according to the prevailing market trends and demands at the national level.

To build synergies, we have linked the efforts of other institutions such as the women skill development program of Small Industrial Development Board (SIDB) of government of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Through a memorandum of understanding, we have agreed to pool resources and energies towards the economic empowerment of women in the disasters hit Swat-Malakand region for creating a greater impact.

During my interactions with women from Swat-Malakand region in our political empowerment program known as Jamhori Maidan program (JMP), I have felt extreme joy to see women taking an interest in democracy, political process and elections. It has enabled me to overcome the disappointments and depressions that I had experienced during my work with women IDPs from the region in 2010. The most amazing development in the JMP is the reality that women are not only taking interest in political developments but also there is an emerging trend amongst the educated female from the region that they can take independent decision to support a political party of their choice as against the preferences of their male members in their families. I have also seen many more women taking the courage to contest elections as independent candidates such as Ms. Nusrat Begum from Lower Dir, where she run for National assembly seat. Even women with disabilities are politically active and aware of their role in the society.

 The JMP  has engaged men and women from Malakand region to get engaged in bridging the gap between state-institutions and citizens through formation of citizen’s forums. Young women and men of the area have been trained to become leaders in the political sphere. Through radio talk shows, women and men have taken part in the discussions that relate to women participation in the political processes and their rights as equal citizens of Pakistan. In my opinion this is a huge development in changing the discourse and propaganda of the militants that they made through the use of FM radio channels in Swat-Malakand region.

To make these changes sustainable and provide them institutional backing, we have reached a memorandum of understanding with the Provincial Commission on the Status of Women (PCSW) to support the establishment of the District Committees on the Status of Women (DCSW) in three districts of Malakand division that include Lower Dir, Upper Dir and Malakand. The women leaders that have been trained in the JMP in the three districts are the potential nominees for the DCSWs.  It is rather saddening to see the pro-women PTI government being slow in notifying the DCSW in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. The DCSW have an important function with regard to cases of gender-based violence (GBV) and gender sensitive planning, budgeting and monitoring at the district level.

There are many women now ready to contest the forthcoming local government elections, as independent candidates after our political training program but unfortunately the local government elections in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa have not been held so far. These eager and motivated women leaders from the region are looking forward to the local government institutions as a great opportunity of their political empowerment and testing their leadership skills.

Let us hope that this journey of peace and progress continue in the region for our bright future.

Shad Begum is a human rights activist from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, and a recipient of international women of courage awards.

— 1 hour ago with 3 notes
#khyber pakhtunkhwa  #activism  #women empowerment  #women in conflict  #women's rights  #education  #idps  #swat 
Anonymous asked: How do muslim girls know so much about sex?


Answer:

sheliveswithoutdoubt:

niqabisinparis:

It’s weird isn’t it cause we were locked in closets all our lives isolated from the rest of the world. Do babies come from trees?

Obviously Muslims grow from trees

— 1 hour ago with 138 notes

micdotcom:

Here’s what sex — and other bodily functions — look like in an MRI machine

Ever wonder what’s really going on inside your body? And not just that lame classroom skeleton or those creepy, albeit kind of cool, Bodies exhibitions. No, you want something that really gives a good picture of what’s happening inside your body as you’re moving around… or as something is moving around inside your body.

To give us a better idea of what that kind of stuff looks like, Vox compiled snippets of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans that show just what’s actually happening inside your body in some everyday (and some NSFW) moments.

 Watch: Sex, birth, breathing and more

(via cawwmeow)

— 2 hours ago with 812 notes
http://arabrhizome.tumblr.com/post/98058447431/secretdiaryofapashtungirl →

secretdiaryofapashtungirl:

arabrhizome:

That’s interesting. I have found that i have become more militant in my leftist views, i hear this is normal.

I’ve always heard the…

priceofliberty This was the point i was going to come to next. In mainland Europe there is no middle ground and British parties are very detached from the ideologies they initially started with, just take a look at Labour. Soon we’ll just merge into a two party system which no actual real difference in policies that runs on populist vote. As soon as The Tories become more extreme to win over the UKIP supporters. 

— 2 hours ago with 9 notes

arabrhizome:

That’s interesting. I have found that i have become more militant in my leftist views, i hear this is normal.

I’ve always heard the opposite. The truism that you get more right wing as you grow older. But in my case it’s quite the opposite.

I feel as though we live in a time where if one is politically involved, you are very likely to be radical in your views, may it be left or right. The middle ground in politics is very blurry right now.

— 3 hours ago with 9 notes

farsizaban:

Qajar era Iranian paintings 

(Source: iroon.com, via farsizaban)

— 3 hours ago with 146 notes

Little monks having a snowfight in Shaolin Monastery Henan, China

Little monks having a snowfight in Shaolin Monastery Henan, China

(Source: mingsonjia, via chorjavon)

— 3 hours ago with 62892 notes

revnews:

Why Cuba Sends Doctors to Treat #Ebola in Liberia and the U.S. Deploys Military Troops

"There’s something just as bad as Ebola for Africa: capitalism and western exploiters and colonizers."

http://revolution-news.com/why-cuba-sends-doctors-to-treat-ebola-in-liberia-and-the-u-s-deploys-military-troops/

(via bootyregrit)

— 3 hours ago with 276 notes